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Entries in iphone (19)

Monday
Aug272012

Understanding Apple vs. Samsung

The Apple vs. Samsung trial continues to be a major topic of discussion on podcasts, blogs and forums. I followed the case fairly closely and feel I managed to grasp the various legal concepts and arguments presented throughout the trial. Because I invested the time and energy to try to understand the details of the case, I was not surprised by the jury's decision. I expected it. And to be quite frank, if an attempt is made to understand the legal issues involved, I honestly don't understand how any reasonable, logical person could disagree with the jury's decision. Contrary to the cries of some individuals that are decidedly pro-Samsung (or anti-Apple), the case was not as simple as "rounded corners" or "dark rectangles." The devil is in the details, as they say.

For anyone that desires a better understanding of why the jurors ruled the way they did, I recommend spending some time with the words of Nilay Patel. Nilay is a tech journalist and managing editor at The Verge. Nilay also happens to have a law degree from Wisconsin Law School and he is a member of the bar in Wisconsin and Illinois. Obviously, Nilay is well-qualified to address the Apple vs. Samsung trial, which he followed closely.

Following the jury's decision on Friday, Nilay posted this article at The Verge:

Apple decisively wins Samsung trial: what it means

I encourage all of my readers to click over and read the article.

Then, on Sunday, August 26, Nilay was a guest on the TWiT Network's This Week in Tech episode 368, hosted by Leo Laporte. I'm a fan of TWiT's lineup of shows and frequently listen to them during my walks. Whether your interest lies in Mac or Windows, iOS or Android, or a variety of other topics, the TWiT Network has a show for you.

I've embeded This Week in Tech episode 368 below. The episode is 2 hours and 15 minutes long. The coverage of the Apple vs. Samsung lawsuit is only about 36 minutes long. As a tech geek, I found the entire show of interest. But if you are only interested in the Apple vs. Samsung discussion, it starts at approximately 9:30 and ends at about 45:30. A couple of key highlights during the discussion: "Willful Infringement" is discussed at 22:10, and the oft-mentioned "Grid of Icons" is discussed at about 40:15.

If you are remotely interested in better understanding some of the legalities at play during the trial, I urge you to watch the entire 36 minutes dealing with the lawsuit.

 

Monday
Aug272012

"And we Intend to Protect Them"

On January 9, 2007 at MacWorld Expo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs formally introduced the very first iPhone in typical showman fashion.  Here are two Jobs quotes from that introduction.

We’re going to touch this with our fingers. And we have invented a new technology called multi-touch, which is phenomenal. It works like magic. You don’t need a stylus. It’s far more accurate than any touch display that’s ever been shipped. It ignores unintended touches, it’s super-smart. You can do multi-finger gestures on it. And boy, have we patented it.

And...

We’ve been innovating like crazy the last few years on this, and we’ve filed for over 200 patents for all the inventions in iPhone. And we intend to protect them.

I love a man of his word!

Sunday
Aug262012

Apple Shines, Samsung Whines!

The day after a San Jose jury awarded $1.049 billion in damages to Apple (Apple vs. Samsung), Dan Frakes, senior editor at MacWorld, posted the following tweet:

When the iPhone debuted, it was widely criticized for having no buttons/keys. Now people think the iPhone’s design is “obvious.”

Well said and spot on, Dan! Before the first iPhone ever shipped the web was filled with predictions that Apple would fail in the ultra-competitive mobile handset business. Let's look back at a few.

On December 23, 2006, before the iPhone was formally introduced to the world, The Register's Billy Ray boldly declared:

As customers start to realise that the competition offers better functionality at a lower price, by negotiating a better subsidy, [iPhone] sales will stagnate. After a year a new version will be launched, but it will lack the innovation of the first and quickly vanish.

It appears Ray's idea of "quickly" will be measured in decades, not months or years.

On January 12, 2007, Businessweek's Steven Wildstrom wrote:

The iPhone may challenge some Treo, Windows Mobile, and Symbian (mostly Nokia) products, but its hardly a threat to BlackBerry.

Fast-forward to 2012 and the iPhone is besting the BlackBerry in the workplace and RIM is struggling to stay alive!

On March 28, 2007, MarketWatch's John C. Dvorak opined:

These phones go in and out of style so fast that unless Apple has half a dozen variants in the pipeline, its phone, even if immediately successful, will be passé within 3 months.

With a grand total of more than 240 million iPhones sold worldwide and sales of each new iPhone model more than doubling the sales of the previous model, it appears Dvorak slightly missed the mark.

On April 30, 2007, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer was interviewed by USA Today's David Lieberman. Ballmer's prediction:

There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance. It's a $500 subsidized item. They may make a lot of money. But if you actually take a look at the 1.3 billion phones that get sold, I'd prefer to have our software in 60% or 70% or 80% of them, than I would to have 2% or 3%, which is what Apple might get.

Oops, Mr. Ballmer! The iPhone currently has 63% market share with AT&T and 54% market share with Verizon. When you factor in the popular iPad and look at web market share, Apple's iOS grabs an astounding 65%Interestingly, Android's web market share is a measily 1%! I wonder which platform web content creators are more likely to support?

And finally, on June 6, 2007, PC Magazine's Jim Louderback confidentally predicted:

It'll be mildly successful (like Apple's desktops and notebooks, which have a 5 percent market share), but not at the level of the RAZR or Nokia's popular phones. 

Let's see, Google bought Motorola Mobility and recently announced layoffs, while Nokia is also struggling to compete. Both are casualties of Apple's confidence it could build a better mousetrap. Other handset makers are stuggling as well. And, by the way, Apple's Mac OS U.S. market share is up significantly, more than double the 5% Louderback quoted.

Those predictions are just a sample. There are many more to be found around the web. But back to Dan Frake's tweet.

Dishonorable Samsung

Before the iPhone became a huge success, the very features that made it truly revolutionary were criticized and dismissed. During the iPhone's developement, none of those features were "obvious" to anyone other than the team at Apple charged with designing the device. But once the iPhone went on sale and became a sensation, other handset makers were caught with their slide-out keyboards heading for the scrapheap. It doesn't take much to imagine the sense of urgency—maybe even panic—that was felt in the boardrooms of competitors. An internal memo described a "crisis of design" at Samsung. Yet, court testimony revealed that Samsung spent just three months mimicking details of the iPhone's design. The San Jose jury found that Samsung was guilty of willfully violating Apple's patented designs and trade-dress on multiple models across the Samsung line. Worse, in addition to copying features of Apple's invention, Samsung had the gall to claim that some of the iPhone's features were so "obvious" they shouldn't be patentable.

If the features were so "obvious" to Samsung (or any other handset maker), why didn't they implement and patent them first?

No, it was Apple that gambled on revolutionizing the smartphone market. It was Apple that spent five years in development reinventing the wheel. It was Apple that spent millions of dollars bringing the dream to reality and legally patenting and protecting the technology. It was Apple that ignored the pre-2007 history of how mobile phones looked and functioned and designed something magical.

So, it is right and just that Apple's employees and shareholders are the ones to benefit and profit from Apple's vision and leadership. Most definitely not Samsung, or any other idea-copying Johnny-come-lately.

Monday
Oct242011

AppleCare+ Punishes the Careful

 

Apple recently introduced its new iPhone extended warranty and accidental damage plan, AppleCare+.  Every new iPhone comes with one year of hardware warranty and 90 days of telephone technical support.  Like basic AppleCare, AppleCare+ increases the iPhone hardware warranty and telephone technical support coverage to two years.  AppleCare+ also adds coverage for up to two incidents of accidental damage with a $49 deductible (service fee) per incident.  AppleCare+ for iPhone is priced at $99 and it replaces the older basic AppleCare for iPhone, which was priced at $69.

I am not a fan of the new AppleCare+ plan.

I am careful with my electronic gadgets.  All I will ever want is the extra year of hardware warranty to protect against manufacturer defects.  Now Apple is requiring me to purchase an accidental damage plan at the same time and charging me an extra $30 for the pleasure.  The way I see it, Apple is punishing the "careful ones" by charging us for something we don't want.  Put another way, we are being forced to help subsidize those that are careless or accident-prone.

Another Significant Change

With the orignal AppleCare plan for iPhone you could wait a full year—until the day before the included one-year hardware warranty expired—before deciding whether to purchase a second year of hardware warranty.  This ability to delay the AppleCare purchase is something that made AppleCare plans different from other manufacturer's extended warranty plans.  It's part of what made Apple, well, Apple.

Delayed purchase also saves money for consumers because it gives them a chance to shop for the best deal.  Some retailers sell AppleCare plans at a significant savings over Apple's prices.

AppleCare+ changes all of that.  Now you have to make the decision to purchase AppleCare+ at the same time you purchase your new iPhone.  (Apple is granting a grace period through November 14, 2011 for new iPhones purchased on or after October 14.)  And I don't expect we'll see Apple, AT&T, Verizon or Sprint giving any discounts on the AppleCare+ plan.

Pony up the C-Note

If you're careful with your gadgets, the AppleCare+ for iPhone plan isn't a change for the better.  AppleCare+ is now more like a run-of-the-mill extended warranty plan.  It's not very "Apple-like" and it forces careful customers to spend an extra $30 for coverage they don't want and will likely never need.  Worse, it makes them pony up the $100 purchase price at the beginning of their new iPhone ownership.  Apple should have provided the accidental damage coverage as a separate plan that could be purchased in addition to the basic AppleCare plan.

I am sure that AppleCare+ will be popular with the iPhone owners that are more apt to drop their iPhone into a toilet or forget that their iPhone is in their back pocket when they sit down.  I'm simply not one of those owners.  And I don't like being forced to pay extra for something I don't need or want.

By the way, it brings me no pleasure to be critical of Apple.  I just think they missed the mark with this decision.

I sincerely hope that AppleCare+ doesn't spread to other Apple products.

 

 

Thursday
Sep292011

iPhone 5 to Support HSPA+ 21 Mbps Technology

According to Japanese site PC Watch, in a keynote speech at Macworld ASIA 2011, China Unicom's vice president of research, Huan Wenliang, told the crowd that Apple's iPhone 5 will support high-speed data transfer HSPA+ 21Mbps technology.  The statement was backed by a slide showing the evolution of the iPhone.  The year 2011 can clearly be seen under the absent image of the iPhone 5, underscoring rumors that the iPhone 5 will, indeed, be announced at next week's (October 4) Apple press event.

iPhone Evolution (click image to expand)

Apple's current GSM (AT&T) iPhone 4 supports 7.2 Mbps HSDPA technology which already gives AT&T's iPhone 4 customers faster data speed than is currently available to Verizon's CDMA iPhone 4 customers.  AT&T has already installed HSPA+ equipment in some markets so iPhone 5 customers in those areas can expect to see improved data speed versus the iPhone 4.

The HSPA+ technology is sometimes referred to as "4G" but the faster LTE 4G technology is not expected to hit the iPhone until sometime in 2012.

Monday
Jun132011

Mac Tip: Managing your iPhone's Camera Roll

Since the best camera is always the one you have with you, I tend to shoot a good number of photos with my iPhone 4.  Many of those photos end up on Facebook or shared via E-mail.  In most cases that's the reason I took the photo in the first place (to share).  Once I've shared them I really don't have any further use for them.  Yet, I find I don't take the time to use the iPhone's Photo app to delete the photos once I'm done with them.  Before I know it, I've got hundreds of photos in the iPhone's Camera Roll taking up precious memory.  Deleting a large number of photos using the iPhone's Photo app is a pain.

Of course, I could use iPhoto or Aperture to import the photos and have the software delete them from the iPhone's Camera Roll after the import.  But, as I said, I really don't have any further use for most of these photos.  What I really need is a way to quickly and easily delete a selected group of photos from the iPhone's Camera Roll without having to import them.  Once the unimportant photos are gone, then I can get down to the business of copying the few that I want to save.

If you've faced this situation before and you are a Mac user, there is an easy solution and it's free!

Apple's Image Capture App For The Mac

Image Capture is one of those "I forgot I had it" apps.  Apple provides the Image Capture application with every Macintosh.  You'll find it in your Applications folder.  Image Capture has a fast, simple interface that makes it child's play to manage your iPhone's Camera Roll (or any supported camera for that matter).

Connect your iPhone to your Mac via USB and, after it's finished syncing with iTunes, run the Image Capture program.  Image Capture has two views, list view and icon view.

Image Capture List View (click image to expand)

Image Capture Icon View (click image to expand)The list view shows you quite a bit of information about your photos.  For the purposes of this tutorial I'll use the icon view.

Deleting Numerous Photos Is Easy

To delete any number of photos from your iPhone's Camera Roll (without importing them), simply use your mouse to lasso the photos or use the Shift-Click or Command-Click shortcuts to select the photos.  Then click the delete button.

Image Capture's Delete Button (click image to expand)That's all there is to it! A dialog box will ask you to verify the deletion.

Image Capture's Delete VerificationClick delete and the photos will be removed from your iPhone's Camera Roll a lot faster than deleting them one at a time using the Photo app on the iPhone.

Importing Too

If you've got some photos you'd like to save to your Mac, Image Capture will handle that too.  And Image Capture lets you control exactly where you'd like to save those photos on your Mac's hard drive!

Select the images you'd like to import and use the Import To menu to select the destination.

Image Capture Import (click image to expand)You will be presented with a number of presets, including your Documents and Desktop folders, as well as iPhoto, Aperture, Mail, etc.  If you want to specify your own destination (new folder, different drive, etc.), select Other.

Image Capture Import Destinations

After you've selected the destination, click Import (for selected number of photos) or Import All.

Image Capture Import (click image to expand)

Again, that's all there is to it.  If you'd like to have Image Capture delete the photos from your iPhone's Camera Roll after you've imported them, check the appropriate box before you start the import.

Image Capture Delete After Import (click image to expand)Image Capture Makes It Easy

If you use your iPhone to take a lot of photos that you don't plan to save, the Image Capture app is a quick and easy way to delete those photos from the iPhone's Camera Roll.  Likewise, if you prefer to import your iPhone photos without using iPhoto or Aperture, Image Capture to the rescue.  And, best of all, Image Capture is free with every Mac!

One More Thing!

As a bonus tip and reminder, the Image Capture application is also the tool you use to control which photo application launches (automatically) when you connect your iPhone (or other camera) to your Mac.

Image Capture Auto-Launch Selection (click image to expand)Happily, you can set it so no photo application gets auto-launched.

Tuesday
May102011

Older iOS Devices Outselling Newer Android Devices

John Paczkowski at All Things D posted an interesting article today.  It seems Apple's older iOS devices are outselling newer Android devices.

Canaccord Genuity analyst Michael Walkley says his retail checks show continued strong demand for the iPhone 3GS at AT&T and iPad 1 at Verizon, even as the iPhone 4 and iPad 2 continue to fly off the shelves. At AT&T, for example, the iPhone 3GS is outselling newer Android phones like the HTC Inspire and Motorola Atrix.

The article speculates that—just as Apple is already the winner at the high end of the market—they are poised to possibly be the winner at the low end of the market too.

Monday
May092011

Apple is the Most Valuable Brand

WPP, a brand performance analysis group, has released their annual BrandZ report identifying the top 100 brands.

Apple became the world’s most valuable brand last year.

The brand increased in value by 84 percent to $153.3 billion. Apple’s rise came as the value of the BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands appreciated by 17 percent to $2.4 trillion, driven by year-on-year growth in all 13 product sectors studied.

Next in brand value behind Apple are Google, IBM, McDonalds and, rounding out the top five, Microsoft.

Let's face it, it's cool to own and use Apple products.  Apple's products continually rate at the top of the charts in performance and satisfaction surveys.  Apple's customer service and support is unparalleled in the computer and gadget industry.  Millions of people around the world love the Apple brand and their ranks are swelling fast.  Apple products are sleek, sexy, highly useable, easily learned, and the best value for the dollar.

Why on earth do some people settle for less?

Wednesday
May042011

Excellent Reason to Encrypt iOS Backups

iTunes offers the ability to encrypt your iOS backups that are stored on your computer.  Turning this feature on or off is done via a simple checkbox on the iOS device's summary page in iTunes.

(click image to expand)

Encrypting the iOS backup on your computer helps protect your personal data in the event someone gets their hands on your computer or hard drive.  But, according to Josh Sunshine at gigaom.com, there's another excellent reason to encrypt your iOS device backups:

There are other, non-security related reasons to encrypt your backups, too. If you restore a new iOS device from a backup of an old one, usually passwords such as mail account passwords aren’t stored, and you’ll have to enter them again on the new device. However, if your backup was encrypted, the passwords will be kept, making the transition to a new device that much easier.

Now that is terrific news!  Every time I've upgraded to the latest iPhone I've had to reenter all of my email passwords.  It's nice to know that checking a little box can not only provide better security on my computer, but also prevent excessive hassle when upgrading to the latest and greatest iOS device!

Wednesday
May042011

Custom iPhone or iPod Install in '99-'01 Miata

In 2007 I detailed a custom iPod install using an earlier model of the Dension iPod Cradle.  Unfortunately, the earlier model only supports the 12-volt charging pin on the iPod dock connector.  In 2008 Apple dropped support for the 12-volt charging pin on new models of the iPhone and iPod.  That meant the latest iPhones and iPods couldn't be charged by the original Dension Cradle.  Subsequently, Dension released an updated model of their Cradle that supports the (now standard) 5-volt charging pin on the iPhone/iPod dock connector.  This article details the installation of the latest Dension iPod Cradle in a 2001 Mazda Miata using the factory radio.

DISCLAIMER:  These instructions are supplied for informational purposes only.  Installation should only be attempted by someone with the necessary technical knowledge and skill.  I cannot be held responsible if you don't know what you are doing and you screw up your iPod, iPhone or your Mazda factory radio.

Follow these instructions at your own risk!

I do not make or sell the necessary home-brew wiring harness so please don't ask me to make you one.

Applicable Mazda Miata Models

This article applies to the following Miata factory radios.

  • 1999 - 2000 Miatas with Single-DIN non-Bose factory radio
  • 1999 - 2001 Miatas with Single-DIN Bose factory radio

Note: This installation might be compatible with certain 1996 - 1997 Miata factory radios.  I do not have any personal experience with these radios.  See Stephen Foskett's Miata Audio Pinouts site for more information about the various factory radios Mazda has used in Miatas.

Why This Custom Install is Possible 

The above Miata models have a 16-pin connector located on the rear of their factory radio.  This connector is normally used to add the cassette player option to the sound system.  Present on this 16-pin connector are direct (line-level) inputs for audio right, audio left, and audio ground.  The 16-pin connector also has a pin that — when +12-volts is applied — turns off the AM/FM circuitry and turns on the direct (line-in) circuitry.  This allows the direct connection of external audio devices, such as the iPhone, iPod or other mp3 player.

Note: If you already have a cassette player in your 1999 - 2001 Miata, you will have to either remove it or figure out a way to tap into the cassette player's wiring harness.

Why So Few Models?

Miata factory radios prior to the mid-1996 model year can also have a direct (line-level) input added.  Those earlier radios have a round connector on the back, which is not being detailed in this article.  However, the information I am providing in this article could be used in conjunction with the 1990 - 1996 factory radio audio pinout designations to fashion a similar home-brew harness for those early models.

Starting in 2002, Mazda switched to a different design for their Miata factory radios.  These later models require a different approach to adding a direct (line-in) input.  Commercial solutions are available from various vendors for 2002+ model years.

Not Every Step is Covered

These instructions assume the installer is already knowledgeable about the disassembly of the Miata's center console and removal of the factory radio.  Lots of helpful information regarding wrenching on a Miata can be found in both the forums and the garage section of Miata.net.

Parts Needed For This Project 

Tools Needed 

  • Soldering Iron
  • Wire Cutter
  • Wire Stripper
  • Multimeter, Test Light, or other method to check continuity
  • Screwdrivers, Wrenches, etc. 

Home-brew Wiring Harness Description 

  • Pin #1 on the 16-pin connector (Audio Right) goes to Pin #1 on the 9-pin miniDIN socket
  • Pin #2 on the 16-pin connector (Audio Ground) goes to Pin #2 on the 9-pin miniDIN socket
  • Pin #3 on the 16-pin connector (Audio Left) goes to Pin #3 on the 9-pin miniDIN socket
  • Pin #6 on the 16-pin connector (Line-In Trigger) goes to the SPST Rocker Switch
  • Pin #9 on the 16-pin connector (+12-volts) passes through the In-Line Fuse and the 1K-Ohm Resistor and goes to the SPST Rocker Switch
  • Pin #4 on the 9-pin miniDIN socket (+5-volts) goes to the positive lead of the Cigarette Lighter Adapter
  • Pin #7 on the 9-pin miniDIN socket (Electrical Ground) goes to the negative lead of the Cigarette Lighter Adapter

Installation Photos and Descriptions

As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.  The following photos should help explain the assembly and installation of the necessary home-brew wiring harness.

Factory Radio

Rear of 2001 Miata Factory Bose Radio (click image to expand)

Note that the 16-pin connector is numbered right to left with odd pin numbers across the top and even pin numbers across the bottom.

Closeup of the 16-pin Connector (click image to expand)

Dension iPod Cradle

Dension iPod Cradle (click image to expand)The Male 9-pin miniDIN Pinouts (click image to expand)

Home-brew Harness

Assembled Home-brew Wiring Harness (click image to expand)

The Female 9-pin miniDIN socket Pinouts (click image to expand)

The SPST rocker switch is installed into passenger-side dash trim cover.  A notch is cut in the corner of the dash trim cover to allow the Dension iPod Cradle's cable to pass through.

Passenger-side Dash Trim Cover (click image to expand)

Home-brew 16-pin Connector

To fashion a 16-pin connector that will fit the 16-pin socket on the back of the factory radio, the two Molex connectors are attached together (stacked) using a piece of the 3M double-sided foam tape.

Home-brew 16-pin Connector (click image to expand)

Home-brew 16-pin Connector Attached to Radio (click image to expand)Routing the Home-brew Harness

The harness is fed through the opening where the dash trim panel was removed.  The 16-pin connector end is fed to the area behind the factory radio.  (Remove the glove box door to gain easier access.)

The Harness Partially Installed (click image to expand)Opening in Dash for Factory Radio (click image to expand)Tapping the Fuse Box

The power to charge the iPhone or iPod is tapped at the factory fuse box using an Add-A-Circuit Fuse Adapter.  This clever device allows you to add a new circuit — complete with its own fuse — to an existing circuit.  I chose to install the Add-A-Circuit Fuse Adapter in the cigar fuse slot of the factory fuse box.

Add-A-Circuit Fuse Adapter (click image to expand)

The Add-A-Circuit Fuse Adapter is connected to the center terminal (+12-volts) of the cigarette lighter socket. The surround of the cigarette lighter socket is attached to any convenient screw that is attached to the Miata's chassis (ground).

Cigarette Lighter Socket (click image to expand)The Add-A-Circuit Adapter in Place in Factory Fuse Box (click image to expand)

Cigarette Lighter Adapter

I did not take photos of the cigarette lighter adapter.  The cigarette lighter adapter is used to convert the vehicle's +12-volts to the appropriate +5-volts needed to safely charge your iPhone or iPod.  Cut off the USB plug at the end of the cigarette lighter adapter's cable and strip the wires.  There should be just two wires.  Red is +5-volts and black is ground.  Use a DC voltage meter to double-check the output voltage and polarity of the cigarette lighter adapter BEFORE you connect it to the Dension Cradle.  It must read about 5 volts.  Do NOT connect higher voltage or you risk damaging your iPhone or iPod.

After installing the Add-A-Circuit Fuse Adapter and cigarette lighter socket, plug the cigarette lighter adapter into the socket and secure it in place with some electrical tape.  You want the adapter to stay nice and snug in the socket.  Tuck the cigarette lighter adapter and socket up under the dash near the factory fuse box and secure the package in place with some nylon wire ties.  Be sure none of the wires are rubbing against any sharp metal edges.

Finally, route the cigarette lighter adapter's cable over to the area behind the center console.  The cigarette lighter adapter's +5-volt and ground wires attach to the appropriate wires on the home-brew wiring harness.

Mounting The Dension Cradle

I mounted the Dension iPod Cradle using a Panavise In-Dash Mount.

Panavise In-Dash Mount (click image to expand)

Keeping Things Neat

I used a couple of black nylon cable clamps to secure the Dension Cradle's cable to the backside of the Panavise mount.

Cable Clamps to Keep Things Tidy (click image to expand)

Time to Listen to Some Tunes

Once everything is installed and hooked up, throwing the SPST rocker switch will put the radio into LINE mode ("LINE" will be displayed on the radio's LCD screen).  Press play on your iPod or iPhone and enjoy your favorite music or podcast!

iPhone Installed in 2001 Miata (click image to expand)

iPhone Installed in 2001 Miata (click image to expand)

Summary

Thanks to this new model Dension iPod Cradle it is finally possible to have an attractive iPod dock mounted in your car and charge the latest iPhone or iPod devices at the same time.  It is also worth noting that the sound quality from the audio pins on the iPhone or iPod dock connector is vastly superior to the sound quality from those devices' headphone jack.

Happy installing!